Innovation Challenges

Challenge Owner(s)
dnata, Grab, JBM Group, Lagardère Travel Retail, LHN Energy Resources, L'Oréal, Procter & Gamble (P&G), Sentosa Development Corporation, Volkswagen Group Singapore, Wee Hur Holdings
Organiser(s) Enterprise Singapore (ESG)
Industry Type(s)
Circular Economy & Sustainability, Energy & Chemicals, Environmental Services, Sustainable Energy, Urban Solutions
Opportunities and Support Prize money, seed funding, paid trial and pilot opportunities await!
Application Start Date 8 November 2021
Application End Date 24 January 2022
Website Click here to learn more

About Challenge

Following the successes of the past two Sustainability Open Innovation Challenges (SOICs), Enterprise Singapore is once again collaborating with key industry partners to launch our third edition of the challenge with challenge statements in key sustainability areas such as sustainable materials, waste management, and many more.

We are inviting innovative companies to participate in this challenge not only for the chance to collaborate with major partners, testbed and access funding to develop the solutions, but to also play a critical role in building a more sustainable future for the world.

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Challenge Owner(s)Lagardère Travel Retail
Industry Types(s)
Circular Economy & Sustainability, Environmental Services, Retail

Lagardère Travel Retail

Building new stores is a very linear process. Retailers are required to tear down and rebuild retail stores every three years to meet the demands of the landlord and customers. An excessive amount of virgin materials and equipment are also required to build new outlets. Furthermore, recycling waste from individual stores is difficult as it lacks economies of scale, and upcycling has not been feasible as it is very complex and time-consuming.

Currently, the pool of sustainable materials available on the market are not providing enough innovation or are CapEx-prohibitive. Lagardère Travel Retail has a global network of 5,000 stores in 41 countries. Operating brands like Relay, Bulgari, Longchamp, Ferragamo, Starbucks, Paul, Discover, Lululemon, Marks and Spencer, Sydney Opera House, Eifel Tower Souvenirs, Victoria Secret, Duty Free concepts across the globe (https://www.lagardere-tr.com/en/brands). Lagardère has piloted several POCs, but have not validated their feasibility. For example, it is hard to find a path to market for the large number of customized furniture they have, to recycle/upcycle in a responsible and cost-efficient manner, and to circularly reuse store materials for other projects.

What We Are Looking For

  1. Material Innovation – Finding new materials that are attractive, durable and suited for a commercial environment (Laminates, plywood, flooring materials – vinyl, ceramic, stone, wood, hardware, paints, glue, piping, ducting etc.)
  2. Materials that can easily be recycled or upcycled back into the ecosystem in a way that creates or maintains value
  3. Products or services can deliver benefits during the lifecycle of the product ie. bring savings in energy or water consumption over time
  4. Solutions must be scalable and not just one-off
  5. Solutions must make financial sense ie. not increase the budget by 30%
  6. Service or product must reasonably accommodate the design and construction timeline and time to market should be 3 months or less
  7. Lighting solutions that go beyond just LED lighting e.g. considers recyclability of the microchips, reuse of fixture components over several store life cycles
  8. Opportunity for new business model Innovation via the monetization of circular practices e.g. lease or subscription base as opposed to traditional buy.

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Challenge Owner(s)Wee Hur Holdings
Industry Types(s)
Circular Economy & Sustainability, Energy & Chemicals, Sustainable Energy

Wee Hur Holdings

Within student accommodations, tenants are provided with unlimited access to Wee Hur Holdings’ utilities. As a result, many tenants tend to exploit the unlimited access by switching on their appliances for long periods of time, despite not being present in their rooms. Currently, similar to hoteliers, Wee Hur Holdings makes use of utilities key cards to supply electricity to tenants.

Reducing energy consumption significantly reduces the amount of carbon emissions in the environment. Therefore, Wee Hur Holdings is sourcing for innovative solutions in managing energy consumption within their student accommodations, to drive sustainable energy for the future.

What We Are Looking For

With reference to a Brisbane student accommodation (1578 rooms),

  • In 2020, at an annualised occupancy of 57%, the electrical bill was AUD $380,000.
  • In 2019, at an annualised occupancy of 80%, the electrical bill was AUD $496,000.

As Wee Hur Holdings operates on an unlimited access model, energy consumption is inevitably higher, leading to higher electricity bills. With the right solution in place, there is room to reduce carbon emission to the environment and the electrical bills.

Wee Hur Holdings is looking for a prototype/MVP that is able to efficiently regulate electricity consumption when the tenant is not present in the room.

Appliances that are not needed should be regulated to save electricity. Only the absolute necessary appliances should be left running (eg. fridge and all existing GPOs (General Power Outlets) in the rooms).

Solutions that Wee Hur Holdings is not interested in:

  • Solutions that require the monitoring of individual room’s electricity consumption, as there are no electrical meters pegged to individual rooms

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Challenge Owner(s)Grab
Industry Types(s)
Circular Economy & Sustainability, Environmental Services, Urban Solutions

Grab

The volume of delivery packaging waste has been growing as more consumers turn to takeaways and e-mart deliveries during the COVID-19 pandemic. In Singapore alone, there have been 1.8 million food delivery users (statista.com), many who order food deliveries more than once a week. Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, food deliveries grew 183% in Southeast Asia (thelowdown.momentum.asia), and is set to grow to an estimated US$8 billion by 2025 (techwireasia.com).

Operating in the Southeast Asia context, Grab is aware of pollution issues that could be caused by packaging waste that are not properly disposed of. Grab is looking at ways to eliminate the use of single-use bags for food and/or grocery deliveries.

Currently, all partner merchants will provide their own (single-use) bags to pack food and groceries for delivery. Without them, spillage or item damage might occur during the transport journey, which might mean delivery riders need more time to clean up and food safety concerns might be raised. Single-use (plastic/paper/others) bags are provided by merchants to store items once orders are made, and bag handles are useful to hang items on customer’s apartment door knobs for contactless delivery where requested.

Many times, at least in Singapore, multiple bags are used within a delivery order to separate grocery or food items, such as frozen/wet items from non-perishable products, and drinks from bento boxes.

For food deliveries especially, food safety, freshness, ease of cleaning and transporting in bulk need to be considered as part of the solution. Food and grocery delivery operational flows can be different, where grocery items might be larger in quantity. Operational cost efficiency and flow compatibility from merchant to delivery rider, and to customers, without single-use bags will be priority for this challenge statement.

What will not be accepted are designs of bags/bag replacements without considering the operational flow of how successful deliveries can be made from merchant to the customer’s doorstep for food and grocery deliveries. Also, simply switching to single-use bag alternatives without reduction first/implementation flow/cost/other considerations is outside the scope of this challenge. Note that alternatives tend to be more expensive, and some merchants are already using these - however, Grab’s focus is on eliminating single-use waste generated, especially since some of them take a significant amount of time to break down.

What We Are Looking For

For food or grocery delivery:

  • Solution to be compatible with current Grab delivery storage used; storage is placed on two-wheel (motorcycle, bicycle, etc.) vehicles mainly. Delivery personnel may also travel on foot/public transport.
  • Separate storage needs to be considered for Halal food
  • Dimensions of current storage: 18 x 17 x 14 inches
  • Solution can be scalable and relevant across SEA markets

Desired features in general:

  • If reusable storage solution is provided, that material should be easy to clean and maintain (current storage bag has insulated interior which is easy to clean)
  • Solution does not have to come with storage innovation - main priority is to eliminate single-use bags where possible, and to be compatible with operational flow.
  • If there is use of reusable storage as part of the solution, consideration is made to ensure operational efficiency between passing of reusable storage from merchant, to delivery personnel, to customer, as well as return flow of the reusable storage item(s).
  • Solution is compatible with Grab’s delivery bag/compact design, or compatible with delivery personnel’s mode of transport (walk/two-wheel ride/public transport).
  • Considerations are made to current prevalent perception that all food and groceries need to be bagged - would there be solutions to get around this for seamless operation for merchants and delivery personnel?

For food delivery:

  • Ensure that stacked food packages will not topple during transport.

For grocery delivery:

  • At point of collection, for Singapore, it should allow for segregation of wet/perishable and non-perishable foods.

The solution should also:

  • Support elimination of food spillage, and
  • Display operational compatibility with current delivery flows (details above)
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Challenge Owner(s)Grab
Industry Types(s)
Circular Economy & Sustainability, Environmental Services

Grab

The volume of delivery packaging waste has been growing as more consumers turn to takeaways and e-mart deliveries during the COVID-19 pandemic. In Singapore alone, there have been 1.8 million food delivery users (statista.com), many who order food deliveries more than once a week. Since the start of the COVID-19 pandemic, food deliveries grew 183% in Southeast Asia (thelowdown.momentum.asia), and is set to grow to an estimated US$8 billion by 2025 (techwireasia.com).

Operating in the Southeast Asia context, Grab is aware of pollution issues that could be caused by food container waste that are not properly disposed of. While the types of food containers used are determined by F&B merchants, Grab encourages F&B merchants they partner with to switch to alternative container materials (e.g. reusable, compostable). However, such alternative container packaging materials are not always suitable for local and regional cuisines, where many food items tend to come with sauce, gravy or soup and can result in spillage or league by the time they reach consumers.

Background of Reusable Containers

Over time, Grab has partnered with local players to allow F&B merchants to use reusable containers for GrabFood orders, with a varying degree of effectiveness:

  • Transparent/translucent lids allow merchants to check if order has been correctly packed before handing over to merchants
  • Collapsible containers allow greater ease for returning multiple containers
  • Collapsible containers may be compressed and result in spillage when delivering soup-related items
  • There has been a low take-up rate for the reusable container options, and even lower return rates of the reusable boxes. On the other hand, other factors come into play as well, such as less user-friendly and obvious app features and nudging, and reusable partner vendors not having many locations for container return/drop off.
  • Merchant take-up rate of reusable containers is low due to mainstream convenient/throwaway culture resulting in low demand for such services, as compared to disposable options, meaning it will take up more storage space in shops/stores with space constraints.

Background of Disposable Containers

Many types of single-use materials cannot break down in the natural environment, posing pollution risks in Southeast Asia. Compostable food packaging typically requires industrial composting facilities, while paper-based packaging tend to come with plastic lining so that they are able to hold moist/wet items, which also hinders them from breaking down. In general, the relatively high costs of alternative disposable packaging materials are hindering widespread adoption by many F&B merchants.

Out of Scope for this Challenge

  • Packaging where industrial composting is necessary
  • Oxo-degradable/oxo-biodegradable packaging
  • Recyclability as the sole positive sustainability attribute of the proposed product
What We Are Looking For

We are looking for

  • Solutions which can be reusable or disposable
  • Weight to be kept under 300g per unit (ideally < 200g)
  • Variety of sizes preferred - most commonly-used size of food containers is 700mL-1000mL (considerations given to dry/oily/soupy food items)

Solutions should also:

  • Be able to hold hot food that comes straight from the stove - handling safety, consumption safety
  • Be able to hold wet food items (e.g. soup, food with gravy) under normal handling circumstances
  • Be resistant to breakage under normal handling circumstances
  • Eliminate spillage

For disposable container option:

  • Lower environmental impact than commonly used single-use plastic packaging in the SEA waste infrastructure setting
  • To focus on material innovation which fulfils above-mentioned circumstances

For reusable container option:

  • Besides design innovation of container, to focus on how containers can fit seamlessly into operational flow (Merchants are willing to use/they do not take up space in storage → Food does not spill/compress during delivery → Customers are willing to return to promote reuse → Feasible processing for containers to be reused at merchants)
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Challenge Owner(s)L'Oréal
Industry Types(s)
Circular Economy & Sustainability, Energy & Chemicals, Retail

L’Oréal 

For L’Oréal, offering responsible, sustainable packaging for their products is both a major challenge and a key commitment. Since 2007, L’Oreal has taken an eco-design approach to packaging. Adopting an approach like this means rethinking products in a holistic way, from design through to post-use recycling of packaging.

L’Oréal Group has already launched water soluble pods that contain a bleach powder in the US for the REDKEN brand. The soluble films used as the envelope of the pods are today made from a fossil-based polymer that solubilizes in water and is easily biodegradable in water. Formulas containing water are therefore incompatible with this kind of film. L’Oréal has not yet identified a film that is water soluble but that contains water-based cosmetic formulations.

L’Oréal is not interested in:

  • Traditional forms of packaging that do not help to reduce waste
  • Packaging that are not eco-friendly (non-toxic to aquatic life and biodegradable)
  • Materials with unclear/undefined/ “non-green” source of origin
  • Conceptual solutions, e.g. Refill and repurpose concepts for existing packaging
  • Not compatible with cosmetic use
What We Are Looking For

  1. Compatible with water-based formulation having at least 65% of water,
  2. Stable for at least 6 months at 40°C in presence of water-based formulation having at least 65% of water
  3. Needs to dissolve in water in less than 2 minutes at room temperature upon stirring
  4. Has to be compliant with biodegradation protocol OECD301B
  5. Sealable at moderate temperature to avoid insoluble particles
  6. Technology Readiness Level (TRL): 5 in 2023

If your solution meets criteria #1 and #6 and at least one of the other criteria, don’t hesitate to apply.

Challenge Owner(s)L'Oréal
Industry Types(s)
Circular Economy & Sustainability, Energy & Chemicals

L’Oréal

L’Oréal manages consumption of natural resources to ensure that their activities are compatible with a resource-constrained planet. L’Oréal promotes the use of renewable raw materials that are sustainably-sourced or derived from green chemistry. L’Oréal is also working on solutions that allow for more recycling and which promote the development of a circular economy.

By 2030, L’Oréal aims to have 95% of their ingredients in formula to be bio-based, derived from abundant minerals or from circular processes.

What We Are Looking For

L’Oréal is interested in:

  1. Materials/Ingredients:
    • Functional material that is sustainably sourced or derived from green chemistry.
    • Green and sustainable materials that are not just a 1-to-1 swap but can provide functional benefits and/or added value for cosmetic applications.
  2. Formulations that reduce the use of petrochemicals, e.g. formulations that:
    • Create new sensorial experience on skin or hair without the use of petrochemicals
    • Protect aqueous formulation from microorganism contamination without the use of petrochemicals
    • Modify the shape or the color of hair fibers without petrochemicals
  3. Finished products that:
    • Provide new or innovative beauty routines that reduce water consumption
    • Have non-toxic and harmless end-of-life
    • Protect skin/scalp/hair fibers against light and UV radiation
    • Have adhesive or cohesive properties on skin or hair, and still retain the smoothness of hair and skin
  4. Others:
    • Solutions inspired by nature or developed in the frame of biomimicry principles
    • Technologies to recycle carbon emissions such as CO2 or CH4 as a source of crude material

Solutions that we are not taking into consideration:

  • Pure marketing ingredients without proven performance backed by scientific research
  • Materials (ingredients) that do not meet the green sciences criteria (i.e. they should be eco-friendly, non-toxic for aquatic life, biodegradable and derived from sustainable sources)
  • Materials that are not suitable for cosmetic use
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Challenge Owner(s)Procter & Gamble (P&G)
Industry Types(s)
Circular Economy & Sustainability, Digital/ICT, Environmental Services

P&G

Most product manufacturing processes utilize ‘virgin’ raw materials to make products, which ultimately are consumed and can lead to post-use waste (e.g. in landfills or incinerated).

P&G is looking for potential partners to propose unique solutions - processes, technologies, or technology-building blocks and services to, with innovation and development, tap on waste streams to manufacture its products, where waste becomes valuable, while reversing the environmental impact it creates by achieving a net negative carbon footprint.

What We Are Looking For

Scope: Solutions should be applicable in P&G Products and to serve the needs of consumers in the categories in which they play:

  • Formulated products such as for Laundry, Household, Hair or Personal Care;
  • Assembled substrate based products such as for Baby Care (diapers) or feminine protection;
  • Manual or electromechanical devices such as used for grooming/shaving and Oral Care
  • Packaging for these products.

Performance Criteria:

  • Key measure is carbon and environmental impact that is net negative.
  • On par with current product efficacy/performance or elevated products efficacy
  • Elevated consumer desirability and perceived value among target audience
  • Consideration to supply chain of waste streams involved.

Solutions will ideally address the full lifecycle of products and packs, their sourcing/manufacture, distribution or service model, consumption, and end of life.

Suggested Solution Types (but not restricted to):

  1. Solutions from waste that target key starting materials that are building blocks for raw materials already used in our consumer products - such as ethylene, propylene, acrylic acid
  2. Waste Materials being used to produce new raw materials that could replace existing raw materials for our products or packaging - such as Agricultural waste converted into substrates for products or packaging or Food waste used to make fragrances that can be used in many categories
  3. Solutions that deliver complete new products or packages, sourced from waste feedstocks and with positive impact through the supply chains
  4. Entire Consumer propositions fueled by waste and with positive impact across the entire value chain

Excludes: Home composting solutions

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Challenge Owner(s)dnata
Industry Types(s)
Circular Economy & Sustainability, Energy & Chemicals, Environmental Services

dnata

As a leader in the air services and travel industries, dnata recognises that environmental responsibility is core to its long-term business success. dnata is committed to minimising the environmental impact of its operations across all its businesses and activities, including its supply chain. dnata aims to meet the needs of its customers while using energy and resources efficiently, minimising waste, and operating its assets in the most environmentally responsible manner. Specifically, dnata is looking to improve how they manage their wastewater, which comes from various sources, such as day-to-day operations that include the central kitchen and office facilities.

The solution can tackle various aspects, such as reduction of water usage or recycling our wastewater from our central kitchen and ground operations for internal re-use. Currently we lack the infrastructure to support these needs.

What We Are Looking For

Proposed solutions should take the following into consideration:

  • A solution that can reduce water usage or repurpose the wastewater generated from the main water utilisers in dnata such as the central kitchen and office for internal re-use, i.e., the air-conditioner water cooling system
  • Able to reduce our current water inflow and outflow by 20% (based on our average water consumption level)
  • A solution that is long term and scalable, with possibilities to be transferred to other stations in our network
  • A solution that is simple to implement and operate without a major overhaul of our current processes
  • Capabilities to monitor and track the amount of water saved.
  • The recycled water needs to fulfil the approved water quality standard; hence a quality check may be necessary before it can be repurposed.
  • The solution should not consume more energy, record higher carbon emissions than the current system and should not emit hazardous chemicals

Some contextual information about dnata’s operations that may be helpful:

  • The content of wastewater generated from the dnata central kitchen and office consists mainly of solids, oil, grease and food.
  • The Cooling Tower has a capacity of 700 tons per day, only 20% to 30% of its capacity is utilised daily
  • On average, water consumption for the central kitchen is about 9000 m3 per month.
  • Wastewater generated is channelled straight to the treatment plant, no prior catchment to temporarily store

dnata is not looking for:

  • Using repurposed water for toilet flushing and washing purposes
  • Similar solutions to the current system, i.e., treating the wastewater and discharging it into the sewer
  • A solution that will incur major changes to the existing infrastructure, e.g., extensive piping and modification
  • A solution that occupies a large area due to space constraints
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Challenge Owner(s)JBM Group
Industry Types(s)
Circular Economy & Sustainability, Energy & Chemicals, Sustainable Energy

JBM Group

JBM Group currently imports boilers for its waste energy plants, which do not work well with the composition of waste produced in India. JBM Group is scouting for a solution which promotes an efficient way of waste collection and energy production, keeping the exhaust emissions of its waste energy plants at a sustainable rate (zero of negative emissions of CO2 and other greenhouse gases). The incinerator boiler which burns waste should be compatible with low-calorific value waste (around 1400KCal).

India doesn’t have a fully segregated collection of Waste which is usable. The calorific value is very low (so lack of raw material) and for this we are looking to find a solution. The driver behind this problem is also a push in prioritization by the Indian government.

What We Are Looking For

  1. The incinerator boiler which burns waste should be compatible with low calorific value waste (somewhere around 1400 KCal
  2. The solution has to be able to work with given the current composition of general (municipal solid waste, MSW) waste in India
  3. To some level waste can include industrial and building waste like concrete
  4. The products must comply with the applicable regional standards and solutions as per norms in India – MSW 2016
  5. The results at prototype stage will be monitored and observed before providing clearance for final product(s)
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Challenge Owner(s)Sentosa Development Corporation
Industry Types(s)
Circular Economy & Sustainability, Sustainable Energy

Sentosa

There are considerable amounts of horticultural waste, food waste and plastic waste on Sentosa. Sentosa Development Corporation (SDC) would like to explore recycling or upcycling for such waste.

Given that Sentosa is a tourist destination, we can envision a small-medium-sized portable container system where our waste can be upcycled by tourists/visitors into useful products.

The solution must be simple to operate so that a visitor can interact with them. The whole process from waste to a finished product should take less than 10 minutes.

What We Are Looking For

  1. System to upcycle food, horticultural and plastic waste
  2. Upcycled products can be useful materials for making products such as furniture, building materials, bowls, cups, flower pots, other souvenir items, energy etc.
  3. Ideally the system should be able to harness alternative energy as a power source i.e. solar energy
  4. Ability to engage and involve guests in the upcycling process in a safe environment
  5. System should not produce significant negative environmental impacts such as emissions.
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Challenge Owner(s)Lagardère Travel Retail
Industry Types(s)
Circular Economy & Sustainability, Digital/ICT, Logistics, Retail

Lagardère Travel Retail

Volatile traffic patterns and changes in flight scheduling, and terminal operations makes planning and forecasting the optimum product range in Lagardère’s Gift and Souvenir stores a challenge.

The current offering is very wide ranging from apparel, trinkets, packaged food, wellness and jewellery products, while the stocking and line-up is based on historical sales performance. This sales performance analysis is inherently an ‘offline’ assessment on past sales and does not factor in a wide array of possible forward-looking enriching data sources.
Although the data indicates current sales patterns, it lacks insight on missed opportunities regarding unmet consumer needs and consumer critical data related to traffic patterns and nationality mix (for example), is used in hindsight.

The in-store experience is meant to be like a vibrant bazaar. However, this entails having a tremendous variety of products that do not all sell well as they may not be catered to the background, culture and preferences of the dynamic customer base.

Lagardère procures and stores a large supply of products in their warehouse to deliver this experience, and inevitably over/under stocks items leading to inefficiency and waste (as in lost sales opportunities, supply chain inefficiency and overstock going to waste).

Industry trends show increasing customer desire (and purchase intent) towards more sustainably sourced products, packaging and or a sustainable product offering.

The current sustainable product offering range in our Gift and Souvenir stores is limited and not sales productive. Lagardère has not been able to project outwards a desirable, trends-meeting, and cost effective product margin.

What We Are Looking For

The desired solution will be able to:

  • Access and integrate complex real-time airport/terminal traveler data, retail planning and operational data.
  • Access and accurately predict and forecast customer trend preferences and provide souvenir offering guidance
  • Enable real-time stock and supply chain management preventing overstocking, loss of sales, and any operational aspect that results in waste generation

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Challenge Owner(s)Procter & Gamble (P&G)
Industry Types(s)
Circular Economy & Sustainability, Digital/ICT, Energy & Chemicals, Urban Solutions

P&G

Water scarcity is a critical challenge brought about by climate change and already affecting billions of livelihoods. According to WWF, by 2025, it is predicted that 2/3 of the world population will face water shortages. This will have huge impact on the haircare in-shower category as consumers seek for alternatives to either (1) reduce their shower frequency or (2) reduce water usage in the shower with the ultimate ambition of going for waterless haircare

P&G aims to radically reduce (ideally eliminate) the amount of water consumers require for their haircare routine without compromising efficacy and consumer delight.

What We Are Looking For

The solution should deliver the same or better efficacy and consumer delight vs. existing products and solutions. Solution should include an overall (holistic) assessment of the sustainability benefit

Examples of desired solutions can include (but are not limited to):

  • New devices or device enabled chemistries
  • New chemistries/ formulas e.g. (quick rinsing technologies, device amplified chemistries, etc.)
  • Combining /decoupling solutions and routines that can play a role in reducing shower time (shaving, oral care, etc.)
  • Alternative cleaning mechanisms can replace (not just extend) the consumer’s need to wet clean and reduce hair care’s water footprint
  • “Smart” shower technology can reduce shower time and/or water usage

Excludes solid and dry shampoo

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Challenge Owner(s)Volkswagen Group Singapore
Industry Types(s)
Circular Economy & Sustainability, Digital/ICT, Land Transport, Urban Solutions

Volkswagen Group Singapore

Volkswagen faces a big task ahead of them in the automotive industry: providing sustainable mobility for everyone on the planet. This not only means becoming entirely carbon-neutral across the supply and production chains, including material sourcing, but also means reducing the use of primary materials by, instead, closing resource cycles in a circular economy approach with a focus on recycled and renewable materials. In addition, it is important that the production of raw materials has a positive influence on local social conditions - in particular, it must lead to local customer and supplier empowerment to reduce social inequality. Upcoming legislation will also require Volkswagen’s vehicles to become zero-emissions from front to end of production, and Volkswagen has committed to being entirely supply chain emissions-neutral by 2050.

To achieve this, Volkswagen needs materials that comply with the goal of decarbonisation, ideally even providing a negative carbon footprint through reuse of atmospheric CO2 through carbon capture and utilization or through the use of plant-based materials. At the same time, these materials need to comply with the high quality requirements of automotive materials, and should be usable in a circular resource cycle. Volkswagen is looking for materials that are sustainable in every form of the definition: ecologically (CO2-neutral/negative and circular), socially (regional and ethically correct), and economically (scalable to mass production at similar prices - taking future carbon pricing and legislation into account).

This challenge aims to source for materials that come from ethically and ecologically correct sources, so they must be traceable across the entire supply chain. This is to ensure that Volkswagen’s products come from harmless sources and also have a positive impact across the value chain.

Volkswagen is looking for the most innovative solutions which will allow them to track materials across their sourcing, transport, production and supplier chains, in order to track and trace the sustainability of their production process, including the recycling of materials after first usage. The solution will most likely comprise both a hard- and software solution.

A use case, for example, could be how we can label interior bio-based plastics used for dashboards from sustainable sources, and can reliably guarantee its sustainability up and until the point it ends up in the car and even after the car gets cycled. Volkswagen Group has a significant number of similar use cases across all raw materials that they use, including steel, polymers, among other.

What We Are Looking For

  • Able to survive production and recycling process
  • Tamper proof
  • Implementation should have a very low impact on Volkswagen’s primary processes
  • Implementation can be used in Volkswagen’s technologically most and least sophisticated processes
  • The solution has to be an improvement compared to current tracing possibilities in place
  • The technical and usage properties of the materials in which the tracking is done shouldn’t be affected
  • The solution itself should be CO2 neutral or negative
  • Commercially viable compared to current production costs
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Challenge Owner(s)Volkswagen Group Singapore
Industry Types(s)
Circular Economy & Sustainability, Land Transport, Urban Solutions

Volkswagen Group Singapore

Volkswagen faces a big task ahead of them in the automotive industry: providing sustainable mobility for everyone on the planet. This not only means becoming entirely carbon-neutral across the supply and production chains, including material sourcing, but also means reducing the use of primary materials by, instead, closing resource cycles in a circular economy approach with a focus on recycled and renewable materials. In addition, it is important that the production of raw materials has a positive influence on local social conditions - in particular, it must lead to local customer and supplier empowerment to reduce social inequality. Upcoming legislation will also require Volkswagen’s vehicles to become zero-emissions from front to end of production, and Volkswagen has committed to being entirely supply chain emissions-neutral by 2050.

To achieve this, Volkswagen needs materials that comply with the goal of decarbonisation, ideally even providing a negative carbon footprint through reuse of atmospheric CO2 through carbon capture and utilization or through the use of plant-based materials. At the same time, these materials need to comply with the high quality requirements of automotive materials, and should be usable in a circular resource cycle. Volkswagen is looking for materials that are sustainable in every form of the definition: ecologically (CO2-neutral/negative and circular), socially (regional and ethically correct), and economically (scalable to mass production at similar prices - taking future carbon pricing and legislation into account).

This challenge aims to source for materials that come from ethically and ecologically correct sources, so they must be traceable across the entire supply chain. This is to ensure that Volkswagen’s products come from harmless sources and also have a positive impact across the value chain.

Volkswagen is looking for material solutions which are, ideally, carbon-negative, sourced from recycling or renewable sources and recyclable or biodegradable at their end-of-life. For example:

  • Steel alloys with less carbon emissions during mining, transport and production. This process should be traceable from source to vehicle.
  • Sustainable steel substitutes (i.e. alternative structural materials with steel-equivalent material properties, like wood, self-reinforced composites, etc.) usable in Volkswagen’s vehicles are also an option
What We Are Looking For

  1. Measurably reduced CO2-footprint (Life Cycle Analysis based on DIN…)
  2. Trackable (ESG-)sustainable material sourcing
  3. Automotive material requirements (longevity, robustness, surface quality, etc.)
  4. Highly scalable production
  5. Either recyclable or biodegradable
  6. Energy-efficient production
  7. Commercially viable compared to current production costs
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Challenge Owner(s)LHN Energy Resources
Industry Types(s)
Electronics, Precision Engineering, Sustainable Energy

LHN Energy Resources 

LHN Energy Resources have lands that do not have long enough lease to recover capital expenditure. Current approach of dismantling existing PV systems located at open-air ground locations and rooftops can be tedious and time consuming as there are many components in the system. These PV systems tend to be custom designed to suit a particular site and not entirely re-useable at another location.

As such, we are interested in mobile PV systems that can be easily transported and deployed at our chosen site within short period of time to maximise solar energy generation. The solution should also be cost competitive against current amount spent on mobilisation, dismantling and reinstall.

What We Are Looking For

The proposed solution should take the following into consideration: 

  1. The SS bolts and nuts used currently are prone to damages during the installation process, causing them to be stuck. The proposed solution may consider using SS bolts and nuts of a different material to decrease likelihood of damages occurring.
  2. The solar panels must be able to be packaged vertically to protect the integrity of the product during the transportation process.  
  3. As different buildings have different dimensions and site requirements, the DC and AC cable length will have to be tailored accordingly. The proposed solution should account for re-using these cables in the most efficient way. 
  4. The system should be modular design that can be easily installed and dismantled. 
  5. It should also be transportable and easy to hoist e.g., like a shipping container
  6. The current re-deployment downtime is around 3 weeks and we would like to bring it down to ideally 1 week. 
  7. There should be built-in electrical and electronics with one connection to grid. 
  8. Damaged module, inverter and structure should be recycled. 

In addition, for systems deployed on the rooftop: 

  1. In terms of the design when the structure is being mounted, the seam clamps should allow efficient changing to cater for the dynamic nature of roof types, eg from kliplok to trapezoidal seam.
  2. For RC roofs, the concrete ballast weight can be 80kg. Therefore, there should not be any usage of forklift during the dismantling process. 

 For system deployed on open-air ground location 

  1. Modular, able to package into 20-40 ft container, all system is as one part and can be fold and open to install in the shortest time. System may include wheels for movement
  2. Able to change operating panels amount to suit different building incoming current capacity incase breaker size is small 
  3. Able to carry out maintenance and change panel if there are any damage 
  4. Able to overcome wind uplift force 
  5. Each system can be 18-20 pcs solar panel which voltage shall less than 1000V, and there is connection method between each individual system to combine multiple to a bigger system

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Challenge Owner(s)Sentosa Development Corporation
Industry Types(s)
Sustainable Energy, Urban Solutions

Sentosa

There are significant tidal waves under the Sentosa Boardwalk from Harbourfront to Sentosa and the tidal flow can change directions (i.e. bi-directional). Sentosa Development Group is looking for solutions to make this tidal energy into consumable energy.

To do so, Tidal turbines can be used and Bi-directional tidal turbines would be better able to capture the tidal energies and be more cost effective.

Sentosa Development Group is also looking into opportunities to make the boardwalks more guest-friendly and also acts as a place for public education on tidal energy as an example of renewable energy.

What We Are Looking For

  1. Boardwalk of approx. 250m x 1.5m
  2. Achieve maximum electricity output with projected payback of no more than 10 years
  3. Supporting structures of the bi-directional turbines to the Boardwalk should be aesthetically pleasing structures of the turbines to the Boardwalk should be aesthetically pleasing
  4. Features for public engagement
  5. Prototype (1 or 2 turbines) must be demonstrated to be able to generate power and capture tides from both directions. The generated power must be able to be channelled to the nearby amenities for direct consumption. Upon successful prototype, the solution can be scaled up to more sections of the boardwalk.
  6. The scaled-up project should include a Power Purchase Agreement.
  7. Vendor to seek approval from relevant authority for deployment of the tidal turbines if necessary.
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Challenge Owner(s)Grab
Industry Types(s)
Circular Economy & Sustainability, Digital/ICT, Electronics, Land Transport

Grab

Increasing fuel efficiency can help reduce the carbon emissions of vehicles, mitigating their contribution to climate change. There are a myriad of factors affecting fuel efficiency, such as maintenance of a vehicle, nature of route, weather condition, traffic condition, idling engine, driving behaviour, among others.

To date, there has been no effective feedback loop connecting the drivers’ behaviour and the car’s condition to the quantifiable impact on fuel efficiency. Any available system is time-delayed (monthly reports) and hence cannot be used to effectively enhance conditions in real-time. With a significant number of drivers on Grab’s platform, any improvement in fuel efficiency can achieve a significant positive impact on overall carbon emissions in Singapore and in Southeast Asia.

Grab has piloted distanced-based solution - recommending the most time-efficient route for passengers to help with reducing distance travelled, ideally reducing fuel consumed - which, however, has proven to be unsuccessful. Other solutions need to be explored to help increase fuel efficiency beyond recommending the shortest-distance route, as many factors influence that. Switching of vehicle fleet solutions are also out of scope for this challenge.

What We Are Looking For

  • Any proposed sensor system, device, or hardware is required to be integrated with Grab’s app in a compliant, stable and reliable manner
  • The solution needs to be able to measure, and integrate in real-time, the data of all critical behavioural and conditional vectors. The solution needs to have as limited as possible real estate in the car, and minimal implementation complexity.
  • Ability to measure/demonstrate reduced carbon emissions with proposed solution
  • Road safety for drivers and passengers is a top priority. Any solution should be non-invasive and non-distracting.
  • During stage 1, pilot-testing in Singapore to demonstrate reduced carbon emissions, as well as driver adoption rate/satisfaction.
  • Following a successful pilot, during stage 2, the solution will be integrated with Grab’s app
  • Implementation of a final integrated solution across Southeast Asia where Grab operates.
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Challenge Owner(s)JBM Group
Industry Types(s)
Energy & Chemicals, Land Transport

JBM Group

Currently, raw materials for battery options are expensive and difficult to procure. Manufacturing of batteries for JBM Group is carried out overseas, and they have no factories in India at this point in time. Existing batteries that could power an E-Bus would either be too big, too heavy or have insufficient storage capacity to power sufficient range. Recharging of the buses and batteries also take too long and is not commercially viable for operators (JBM Group’s customers).

This challenge is about designing and developing a sustainable battery solution for JBM Group’s E-Bus that is able to provide sufficient intercity range (at least 500km) and which fits within the current configuration of their existing fleet of buses.

What We Are Looking For

  • The battery has to fit on the existing ground mound of the buses so that passenger capacity is not compromised
  • The battery has to fit in the same space of the bus configuration as currently is being used for the gasoline compartment
  • 196KW batteries are currently the standard for JBM Group’s batteries and these provide ~150km of range which is sufficient for intra-city traffic, but not for intercity transport
  • The dimensions of the battery size should be 1060MM length 660 with 300 MM high at maximum or smaller
  • Weight of the battery cannot exceed 205kg per single battery pack
  • The range of the new battery should be ~500km
  • The products must comply with the applicable regional standards and solutions as per norms – AIS Standards

The results at prototype stage will be monitored and observed before providing clearance for final product(s).

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